Review: Flyte Energy Drink

It’s no secret that I’m pretty passionate about healthy living.  I don’t believe in diets, they’re not good for you physically or mentally, (as a general rule) and, in any case, life’s too short.   However, I do believe in balance, about making sensible, wholesome, choices most of the time and having the freggin pizza and cider (or four) when you want to, just not everyday.

As part of those healthy choices I make a conscious effort to ‘eat clean’ most (not all) of the time.  Fresh, whole foods bursting with vitamins, minerals and flavour genuinely make you feel much better and energetic than heavily processed convenience foods (plus it makes much better Instagram pictures, yes I do that).

When I was approached by Flyte, who describe themselves as a ‘clean energy drink’, I admit I was skeptical.  Energy drinks have a reputation for being highly processed and full of sugar and chemicals, so much so that some brands have been a source of controversy on a global level…I’m really not keen.  However, after being promised it was 100% natural I was willing to give it a go!

What is it?

Flyte is a lightly carbonated energy drink that contains only natural ingredients. Its energy comes from 100mg of caffeine which is extracted from green coffee, rather than being synthetically produced, and is sweetened with extract from the Stevia leaf rather than sugar (a South American plant don’t you know).

In addition, the drink contains what they call ‘natural actives’ such as:

  • Schizandra Berry extract for vitality
  • Griffonia Seed extract for alertness
  • Maca root extract for focus
  • Vitamin B complex for energy
  • A touch of vitamin C – an antioxidant 

It comes in four flavours, Red Berries, Green Mango, Citrus Lemon, Orange Clemantine and each bottle contains less than 60Kcals.

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I have now tried all four flavours and put them to the test, these are my thoughts:

  • Fresh ‘clean’ tasting flavours that aren’t super sweet or overly powerful
  • I’m not a big fizzy drink fan but this is only lightly carbonated and pleasant to drink
  • I often suffer from the typical mid-afternoon slump at work, which isn’t ideal when I have a post-work run planned, so I’ve been drinking these when I need an extra energy hit.  They definitely help me feel much perkier and ready to tackle my workout.
  • Sleek packaging, I love that they come in a recyclable glass bottle so no horrid ring pulls or nasty plastics
  • This is a new brand that is genuinely committed, not only to being healthy and natural, but also to the environment (they are a carbon positive company)
  • My favourite flavour is Green Mango!

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Overall I was impressed with these drinks, they did what they said they would and gave me a pretty instant energy hit, and I love the natural approach.  If you’re keen to give them a try, you can purchase them in packs of six on the website here.

Obviously, if you’re sensitive to caffeine these may not be for you, but if you’re looking for an energy drink without all the usual sugar and chemical crap, keep an eye out for this new kid on the block! Green Mango people, Green Mango…

I was kindly given some Flyte drinks to try out. All views are unbiased and my own.

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Reading Half Training Day

Saturday morning was COLD, the kind of cold that made me ignore the offensively early weekend alarm and roll over.  But it was also the morning of the Reading Half Training Day so I  HAD to get up.  Unfortunately my unscheduled alarm-ignoring meant I didn’t have time for porridge and had to make do with breakfast in the car…

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We started the morning off with an overview of the day ahead and the race itself, which will be on the 18th March.  The Reading Half has been going since 1983 and has since evolved to a rather prestigious race that attracts a wide field of athletes with a pretty magnificent finish in the Madejski Stadium.  I haven’t run this one before so I’m really excited to be part of it this year, especially now I know about the secret wine and beer  hydration’ station at 8.5 miles (unofficial, obvs).  Hey, I ran a marathon drunk so a swig or two of wine will do me no harm whatsoever!

Selfie with the Townsend Twins

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Then came the fun bit, a 30 minute strength and cardio workout with the Townsend Twins, who are the official warm up partners for the Reading Half.  After loosening up, we were put through our paces with several rounds of exercises including squat jumps, lunges, ski jumps, dead lifts, planks, V sit-ups (yes, ouch), glute bridges, cycle sit-ups and back extensions.  It actually got pretty sweaty…and we hadn’t even been for a run yet.

Glute Bridges

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After re-hydrating, we then had a session with Ali, one of the official Reading Half pacers, who took us through all the key elements of pacing your perfect race.  He had lots of top tips to remember on the day:

  • Plan ahead and be prepared, especially on race day.  You don’t want to turn up late and not know where the toilets are (for the record, it’s unacceptable to pee in the bushes…)
  • Don’t panic at the start off the race and let adrenaline take over, you’ll only bonk before you finish.  Easier said than done that one!
  • Don’t weave in and out of people, it just wastes energy.  I’m definitely guilty of this and it makes a real difference when I have the self control not to do it.
  • Break the race down into bite-size chunks, instead of thinking of it as one long 13.1 mile run, think of it in sections
    • Miles 1-3 – get yourself settled into the race
    • Miles 3-11 – keep checking in on yourself to see how you’re feeling and adjust your pace and/or goal accordingly
    • Miles 11-13.1 – take it home and bask in the glory

If you’re interested, Reading will be offering pacers at 5 minute intervals from 1:20 all the way up to 2:30 so make sure you latch on to one of them and let them do all the hard work for you (OK, almost all of the hard work, I mean, they don’t offer piggybacks).

Cold, cold cold!

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Then it was time to run!  After a warm up in the very chilly but sunny air, we were off on a 3 mile loop that took us through the start of the race course in Green Park, and round to the Madejski Stadium where we would be finishing on the track.  Unfortunately it was match day, so we couldn’t go in, but we could loiter suspiciously and peak through the gates imagining ourselves crossing the finish line to the roar of the crowds in the stadium!

Blue skies at the Madejski Stadium

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Back at base, it was onto the serious business of warm up exercises and post-run stretching.  You know, all the things we know we should do but tend to skimp on, or is that just me??  There were a few key things I took from this session:

Before you run:

  • Loosen tight hamstrings with The Slump Test (a new one on me!):
    • Sit on the edge of a table with your legs hanging off and hands behind your back
    • Slump your back so you fall slightly forwards with your head down
    • With a flexed foot, kick your leg vigorously upwards
    • Keep going until they feel looser!

Looks a little odd but it works!

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  • Another one for the hammys –  Heel Kicks.  A good way to do this is to stand arms length from a wall and kick vigourously towards the bum with your knees in line
  • Activate the glutes, yes, every time.  Donkey kicks are great for this

After you run:

  • Make sure you stretch the calves, hamstrings and quads!

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We finished with a Q&A and more info on the day itself.  In addition to the unofficial beer stop, there will be water stations supplied in pouches every 3 miles.  I LOVE the pouches because they are much easier to carry and are less of an injury risk if you accidentally step on one.

Green Park’s Foudry Brook

 

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I thought the Reading Half Training Day was brilliant for both new and experienced runners and I definitely learnt a thing or two about warming up properly!

The Reading Half Marathon is on 18th March and there are still spaces available here if you would like to come and join us.  There’s also a January competition to win some running goodies, including some wireless headphones, a foam roller, a Ron Hill LED light High 5 recovery pack, so make sure you enter!

Note: I will be taking part in the Reading Half as a race ambassador, all views are my own.

 

 

 

2018: Goals, Goals, Goals

Now we’re firmly on the wrong side of the silly season, it’s time to put my money where my mouth is and set some targets for the year ahead (I was going to put something self-depreciating here, but yesterday a friend  firmly challenged me not to say or think anything bad about myself…so I won’t).

1. The Big London Half – 4th March

The Big Half is organised by the London Marathon people and was created with the mission of demonstrating how sport and community can come together, inspiring people from all backgrounds to take part.  They wanted an event that mirrors the diverse demographics of London’s multi-cultural population, it’s new this year and I think it will be a big hit.

This one will be my biggest test in a while and the furthest I’ve really run since the London Marathon 2016 (ohhhhh god, it’s gonna be tough isn’t it?!).  However, I have a marathon to run and I need this to push me through the training. I’m sure it’ll be fine…just fine.

Race Goal: Not be last. Not be sick (that’s not negative, just realistic 🙂 )

2. Reading Half – 18th March

I’m super excited to be joining the Reading Half team as a race ambassador this year.  Reading has been on my list for a few years now, not least because it’s one of the largest and fastest half marathons in the UK, but also because of the incredible finish inside the Madejski Stadium.  Three weeks before Paris, this is good timing for me to practice an even marathon paced run, I can’t wait for this one!

There’s an exclusive training morning being held this Saturday (6th Jan) with an exciting line up of workouts, training advice and Q&A’s.  There’s still a few spots available here if you’d like to join in.

Race Goal: Run at an even pace. Don’t get too excited

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3. Paris Marathon – 8th April

All being well, Paris will be marathon number 14.  It was also my second marathon back in 2012 when I ran with my friend Porridge, and I have fond memories of the beautiful city (I say ran with, she beat me, but we drank champagne together at the end).

Porridge – this one’s for you xx

Race Goal: Get round. Don’t be a fool

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4. Poole 10k – 3rd June

This is one of my favourite races of the season.  Held in my home town of Poole in Dorset, the 10k is part of a Festival of Running that includes a series of minithons for children and a new half marathon this year.  The Poole 10k was my first ever 10k and I love it.

Race Goal:  Dare I utter the phrase PB…? Sub 45 would be just super please

5. Canada Day 10k – 1st July

I’m heading over to Vancouver in July, which just so happens to co-inside with Canada Day, and they’ve thoughtfully put on a 10k in my honour.  It would be rude not to wouldn’t it?!

Race Goal: Earn the post race Canada Day cake (they said there would be cake…)

6. Great North Run – 9th September

Having tried for years to get into this, I finally succeeded in 2017 but, knowing I wouldn’t be able to run with any kind of conviction, I decided to defer.  This year Newcastle and I are going head to head.  I’ll be ready.

Race Goal: To smash it.  Sub 1:45 at least

7. Berlin Marathon – 16th September

Again, I was gutted to have to pull out of this last year, but I was lucky enough to get a ballot spot for 2018 so I’m taking it as a sign that it was meant to be.  Armed with a group of Chasers, this is the big one for me this year.

Race Goal: PB please

8. A sub 21 minute 5k

A tall ask? Maybe. But, if I can go sub 22, I can go sub 21.  Goal before the year is out.

9. Complete my first triathlon

I don’t know when or where, but I fear I can no longer get through another year without succumbing to peer pressure.  You’ll find me at Wednesday night swim sessions soon. Maybe…

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10.  Swim Serpentine – 2 miles

I’m adding this to the list for two reasons, firstly I can’t bring myself to leave the list at 9, and secondly, if I do this one I get a HUGE London Classics medal that’s awarded to people who have completed the London Marathon, Ride 100 and Swim Serpentine.  Call me shallow, but I want it.  The only caveat is that I can’t find a date for 2018 and it may clash with Berlin. Fingers crossed (although I’m not quite sure for which outcome).

Let’s get cracking then…

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Reflections on a challenging year

It’s been an unusual year for me.  Unusual in that I haven’t run a single marathon…or even a half.  I do realise that makes me sound a little unusual, the irony isn’t lost on me.

I tried.  I was full of good intentions, and training plans, and I had my sights set high for a post-foot-surgery comeback… but it wasn’t to be.  Instead I didn’t even start the last three marathons I entered.

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My running kinda went downhill after missing my goal in 2016’s London Marathon.  I lost faith.  Then I ended up having surgery to correct a painful ongoing foot problem which wiped me out.  It took longer to get back to running than anticipated and then I got the fear every time I put my trainers on.  You know, the fear that makes you want to do absolutely ANYTHING else other than what you’re supposed to do.

Track Fear

Sometimes I gave into the fear.  Sometimes I didn’t.  They say things fall apart so that better things can come together.  I guess we’ll see about that.  However, 2017 is coming to an end and it’s time to find some positivity in the things I have done rather than dwelling on those I haven’t, so I tried to find some.

1. I got back on my feet

OK, so I haven’t run all that much this year, but I have run.  I have picked myself up and started the journey back to my usual runner-bean self.  It’s been hard. It’s been physically hard because I felt like I had to teach myself how to run again and it’s been mentally hard because running scared me.  But I got back on my feet.

2. I bought me a bike and cycled almost 3 times as many miles as I ran this year

Yep, me, a bright new shiny pretty blue bike!  And I quickly had to learn how to ride it in cleats, on London roads, because I gave myself just two short months to prepare for Ride 100.

FYI, 2 months is probably, PROBABLY not long enough to go from semi-regular gym spinner to lycra clad 100 mile road cyclist…probably.

First time in cleats on Wimbledon Common

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3. I took that bike and rode 100 flippin’ miles

Which was HARD.  Why didn’t anyone tell me??  Why does everyone have to make cycling look so damn easy?!  Still, I completed my first ever cycling sportive in one piece, and I even started to enjoy it once I remembered to feed myself.  It actually turned out to be 120 miles after I had got myself there and back.  I did not leave my bed for the rest of the day (to be fair there wasn’t much day left by the time I’d finished…)

I cycled 100 miles to the Queens house…I went the long way

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4. I got stronger

Every time I gave into my running fear I found myself at the gym instead.  A lot.  And I had forgotten how much I loved it.  I swapped runs for sweaty spin sessions and went to classes called ‘Broken’ and ‘Insanity’ and ‘Core Wheel’ – you name it, I was there.

I also started lifting/pushing/squatting heavy things again and fell in love with Body Pump once more.  It gives you a different kind of post-workout buzz – and a different type of post-workout ouch (big ouch).

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5. I officially became a Barre Babe (as Nesse calls us)

I’ve been a regular at my Monday night Barre class for about 18 months now and I’ve seen a real improvement in my strength.  Barre is a ballet inspired isometric strength class that works by holding your body still while you work a particular set of muscles to the point of exhaustion.  It hurts, but we do it to hardcore gangster rap (seriously), and have the occasional glass of prosecco after to numb the pain (also seriously).

I absolutely bloody love it and if you fancy it I can promise you that Nesse is the best (and most glamorous) Barre teacher in London – catch her on her website here or on Instagram here.

Nesse on the left…and us trying to be like Nesse on the right.  Photo credit: Instagram @nesseinlondon

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6. I went boxing at the Ministry of Sound

I mean, COME ON!

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So, it’s been an unusual year.  And I didn’t run a marathon. So what?

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Urban Cycling Club: The Next Generation Cycling Studio

This week I tried out Battersea’s brand new Urban Cycle Club and it’s unlike anything I’ve experienced before.  I quickly realised (just by walking through the door) was that it most definitely wasn’t a spin class.  I love a spin class, I really do, but spin is a general fitness class on sturdy, built-for-purpose bikes, rather than an actual cycling workout.

What Urban Cycling Club offer is a realistic cycling experience, on real road bikes, with real gearing systems that allow you to push yourself and hone your cycling specific fitness, without worrying about the London traffic and pollution and being sensible and stuff.  I know this because the workout left me with the same tired feeling I get after going out on my bike rather than a gym class… ie. ready for a long nap.

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The bikes themselves are fully adjustable and there are even some slightly smaller ones if you’re a bit shorter.  As the shortest member of our group I was on the smallest bike near the door, I wasn’t too keen on this at first but the cool night air turned out to be a winner because it got very sweaty very quickly.

The back wheel is attached to a turbo with some kind of top of the range computer system (very high techy-techy) that links to a computer screen directly in front of you. You can monitor your effort, RPM and heart rate (if you’re wearing a monitor) as well as watching your progress on the route.  It also allows you to see everyone elses stats so you can compare your performance.

The first thing we did was establish what our ‘Functional Threshold Power’ (FTP) was which we did by participating in a 15 minute race.  Your FTP is the highest average power you can sustain for an hour, measured in watts, and finding out what it is allows UCC to tailor the intensity of the ride to your individual bike based on your cycling level.  This means that, whilst everyone in the session is doing the same workout, the resistance on the bike is automatically programmed to your fitness level so everyone gets an equal workout.

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The races are fun!  Well, they probably would be if you didn’t come last (ahem) but the other people I was racing with were all super speedy professional-looking Chaser cyclists whilst I turned up post run in my running clothes (note: this was an error, padded shorts, ALWAYS wear padded shorts!) so I’m OK with finishing in a solid 7th place…

Anyway, during the races everyone is on equal ground, you cover the same course and control your own gears in the same way you would on the road, the idea is to simply get to the end first.  We then did a 25 minute interval session where the bikes were programmed to our personal FTP, we were all doing the same workout but the bike would adjust itself based on your fitness.  For example, if we went uphill, my bike would make it easier than Jack’s bike (race winner, didn’t like him) with the view that we were both putting in the same effort.  The screen infront of you told you what RPM you were aiming for and all you had to do was stick to it.  If you did you got a bloody good workout!

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What’s awesome about UCC?

  • There are only 8 bikes so it’s a small group that allows you to get a lot of personal attention from the instructors
  • They will help you establish your FTP
  • You will create your own personal profile with your height, weight, FTP and a history of your rides
  • You can literally race your friends
  • All the gory details of each session are emailed to you as soon as you finish
  • They use real road bikes with real gears
  • You don’t have to worry about falling off or getting into an argument with an idiot driver/other cyclist/small child/excitable puppy
  • It really is some top of the range technology
  • They play some banging tunes
  • There’s lockers, showers, sweat towels and even cycling shoes to hire if you don’t have your own
  • They’re super friendly and go out of their way to help you (useful if, like me, you’re not an experienced cyclist and have lots of questions)

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What’s not so awesome about UCC?

  • There are only 8 bikes – I imagine sessions will get booked up very quickly
  • The seats! At least the seats on a non-padded bum.  Don’t be a fool and rock up in your running compression tights like I did, it will hurt!

If you’re a keen cyclist I really think you’re going to love it. However, don’t be scared if you’re not a super speedy ‘pro’ cyclist, I’m definitely not, but one of the things I loved most about this was that it allowed me to train on a real bike in a safe environment which I think is really important to help newer cyclists build their confidence.  Go along and give it ago, it’s a really unique set-up and a lot of fun!

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Fight Night at Ministry of Sound

Last Friday I went to Ministry of Sound.  However, in stark contrast to the days of the past where I would turn up to a nightclub in impossible-to-walk-in sky high heels and too-short miniskirt, I was comfortably in my favourite lycra and trainers.  That may have been the only thing that was comfortable about the evening however…

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One of the girls at work introduced me to Ministry does Fitness.  It used to be the club’s ‘hidden booze vault’ but has been transformed into a training studio where, as they say, you will sweat your arse off for results.  However, it wasn’t the reasonable sounding ‘cardio’, ‘core’ or ‘endurance’ classes she had in mind, no, it was Hiitbox Volume V.

What is Hiitbox?

“Sonja Moses and her team of Hiitbox Ninjas will deliver that fight night feeling, challenging you to unleash your inner badass and bring your A-game to this high energy HIIT boxing experience! 12 rounds of pads interspersed with high intensity fitness moves accompanied by a live DJ and MC”

Slightly different to the usual Ministry does Fitness classes, Hiitbox is a special event that takes place in the famous London nightclub itself and is all wrapped up by 9pm so the traditional revelers can take over.  I didn’t really know what to expect but, for £30, I was expecting something a little bit special.

Genna and I turned up to the club just before 18.30 where we wrapped our hands up and waited outside for the fun to begin.  I wasn’t overly impressed by this bit, we had already handed our bags over and had to wait outside for just a little too long, it was cold despite the heaters.

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Eventually we were invited inside, reds to the left, blues to the right, accompanied by some hooded Hiitbox Ninjas.  They didn’t look friendly.  It was dark, I was separated from Genna who was on the other side, and we were all lined up against a wall in a corridor.  It was a little eerie.

Before I knew it, there were 3 hooded ninjas jumping up and down and screaming in my face to squat, ‘lower, lower, f**king LOWER’.  It was still dark.  ‘On the floor, push ups, NOW’.  ‘Get up, knees up, higher, higher.’  And that was just the warm up.  Fast, intense and bloody exhausting.  The lead ninja then simply laughed and said ‘now you’re all gonna get f**ked up’.  He was right.

Inside the club I was reunited with Genna and the real fight started.  It’s difficult to describe the atmosphere but the lights were low, the lasers were on, the DJ was in full force and, in true boxing style, an MC was on stage to introduce each of the ninjas and our instructor, Sonja Moses (this is a lady who personifies badass).

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We were then put through 12 rounds of 4 minute high intensity boxing routines each taking it in turns on the pads and gloves.  Starting with some simple punch sequences, that began slowly with, a focus on technique, and finished fast, with a focus on trying not to be sick, these progressed into more complex routines including roundhouse kicks and knee strikes.  The final round consisted of 4 solid minutes of punches and burpees, it was a killer.  I hated it. I loved it. I didn’t know how I felt.  My whole body was shaking.

Hiitbox is more than just an exercise class, it’s an experience that’s geared up to create a proper ‘fight night’ feeling.  There are full on theatrics, fighting talk, and ring girls, with an electric, high energy atmosphere brought about through a live DJ and Sonja herself.  Each round left you gasping for breath, it was intense, sweaty, challenging and totally exhilarating.

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In hindsight, although £30 isn’t cheap, it’s in keeping with London’s boutique spinning studios and bootcamps that easily charge £20 an hour for a regular class, plus you were supplied with water throughout and drinks and snacks at the end.  I was promised “the freshest beats, biggest sound-system, legendary coaches and an epic full body workout” and that’s exactly what I got.

Be warned though, at some point in the middle of the night I woke up and realised I could barely move my entire body.  You will go hard and you will hurt, but if you like being pushed to your limits, you’re gonna love it.

Go with a friend, go with your hand wraps, go with an open mind and go with bags of energy.  But GO!

The Crew. Photo: Tom Webb @tomwebb_photographer

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Do you know how healthy you really are?

Last year, when I was training for the London Marathon, I was tired.  ALL THE TIME.  I’m more than aware that marathon training is tough, but I’ve trained a lot and I know the difference between being overtrained or run down, and something being wrong.  And something was wrong.

I was a regular at morning yoga and spin classes but, when my alarm went off, I just couldn’t get up.  I wasn’t just a bit sleepy, I really couldn’t get up.  After I had finished my long run at the weekend I had to go straight back to bed again.  It wasn’t normal for me.

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Doctors.  They just didn’t get it.  They told me to rest.  But I didn’t just ‘need a rest’ because I know my body can cope (usually).  After demanding a blood test, they simply told me everything was ‘normal’.  But they never gave me the details of those results.

A couple of weeks ago I went for a private blood test with Werlabs which meant I got a full analysis of absolutely everything.

Who are Werlabs?

Werlabs are a service that uses blood testing to help you monitor your health and understand what’s going on inside your body.  The beauty of this test is that, not only is it quick and easy, the results are ready in 48 hours and you can access them in an online journal.

What do they test?

Their main package consists of 44 separate analyses broken down into different risk categories:

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1. Cardiovascular Disease

This looks at your total cholesterol level and how much good and bad cholesterol you have.  In all honesty, I’ve never worried too much about my cholesterol, but my results showed that, whilst I am safely in the ‘healthy’ range, it’s heading towards the higher end so may be something to be aware of.  On the plus side, they made it clear I’m not at risk of CV disease at the moment!

2. Diabetes

This checks your glucose levels to look at your risk of developing diabetes.  I was all clear on this front which was good because I’m sure I have way more sugar than I should!

3. Full Blood Count

A whole range of things are measured in this section including platelets, and the volume and size of red and white blood cells.  This can show up issues such as anemia, long-standing inflammation, and the ability to form blood clots.

I was pleased to see a higher than average haemoglobin level because this is what absorbs and releases oxygen and carries it from the lungs to the body’s tissues.  Just what runners need!

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4. Inflammation and Immune System

This measures your levels of a protein in the blood called ‘C-reactive protein’ which shows general levels of inflammation in the body.  It’s important to test this because it identifies infections and diseases causing inflammation, such as:

  • Cancer
  • Diseases of the immune system
  • Swelling of blood vessels in the head and neck
  • Swelling and bleeding of the intestines
  • Bone infection

5. Iron

A combination of things are tested:

  • Iron – important in the formation of red blood cells and needed for energy metabolism, this helps our muscles and organs work correctly
  • Ferritin – this is the primary way our body stores iron absorbed from our food, the amount of ferritin in your blood indicates the amount of iron stored in your body
  • Transferrin – the main protein in the blood that binds to the iron absorbed from food and transports it throughout the body

Low iron levels are fairly common in female runners and cause, among other things, tiredness, so I wasn’t really surprised that, whilst I was in the ‘normal’ range, I was right at the bottom of it.  I was also in the red zone for transferrin saturation which means I am likely to have an iron deficiency – it explains a lot!

6. Liver and Kidneys

A range of enzymes, protein, potassium and salt levels are tested to check if the liver and kidneys are working correctly and to detect early damage or risk of disease.

Potassium results, my reading is the red dot

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7. Vitamins and Minerals

  • Folic Acid (B9) – an important growth factor required for cell division
  • Magnesium – plays a role in metabolism and can only be absorbed from food
  • B12 –  maintains the functions of your nervous system and can also only be absorbed from food

8. Thyroid

The thyroid is a gland that produces hormones that are released into the blood to stimulate growth and metabolism, it has a direct effect on our energy levels and overall wellbeing.  Three types of thyroid hormones are tested to determine how effectively the thyroid is working and if it’s over or under active.

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Why is this test good?

What I loved most about Werlabs is that each analysis is explained in easy-to-understand language, with a clear explanation of why it has been tested.  It also clearly explains what it means if you are too high or too low on the scale.  On top of this, a doctor goes through all of your results and gives you a personal analysis of your current state of health.

How does it work?

To take the test you simply need to visit the Werlabs website and select the blood test you want.  You then just take your confirmation email to one of their testing locations in London or Manchester for your blood test (many of these are walk-in, I went to St Thomas Hospital and only waited for 5 minutes) and you will receive a text message as soon as the results are available online.

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The full test is quite expensive at £125 but there are cheaper options if you just want to test something specific.  If you’re keen, you can get a 20% discount using code GRUNC20.

I have been genuinely impressed by the whole Werlabs experience and found the level of results fascinating.  I make an effort to keep myself fit and healthy so I’ve never worried too much about my general health, however this experience has highlighted that, if there was something to worry about, I probably wouldn’t even know until it was too late.

It’s safe to say I’ve learned a lot from this and is definitely something I would do again.

Werlabs kindly invited me to try out their service, as always, all opinions are my own.

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